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MERE MORTALS UNITE PODCAST

Right Decision, First Time – Annette Dubrouillet

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On this episode of Mere Mortals Unite, we interview Annette Dubrouillet, who has a company called Decision Drivers. She shares valuable information on what we need to know to make a good decision. Are you a close-ended decider or an open-ended decider? Find out because it makes a difference. Annette shares what to look for in decision drivers, which might be personalities in the process or past experience. Both of these can get in the way of making an informed and thoughtful decision. Don’t get caught up in the syndrome of, “But we’ve always done it this way.” Join us as Annette assists YOU in making the right decision the first time.

You’ll discover:

  • How Annette describes her superpower.
  • Why a good leader doesn’t just focus on what decision should be, but how the decision should be made (i.e. an opportunity to build teamwork and learn to communicate).
  • Four steps to making better decisions.
  • The #1 reason why nothing gets done after a decision is made.

Formulas for controlling your open-ended or closed-ended decision-making styles:

If you are an Open-Ended Decider:

1. Set a limit for the maximum number of options you will consider, using what you think to be a low number. Give yourself an actual number, don’t just say, “I won’t consider too many options.” Be specific, “I will consider no more than three options.”

2. Set a maximum time limit for your decision. Again, be specific, not just, “I’ll decide quickly.” But make the time frame realistic. If you’re deciding on a new job, don’t say you’ll decide within ten minutes. A situation like that would be more of a one- to two-week decision.

If you are a Closed-Ended Decider:

1. Set a limit to the minimum number of options you will consider, using what you think to be a high number. Give yourself an actual number, don’t just say, “I will consider several options.” Be specific, “I will consider no fewer than four options.”

2. Set a minimum time limit for your decision. Again, be specific, not just, “I won’t decide too quickly.” But make the time frame realistic. If you’re deciding about applying for a grant for your organization that has a deadline of next week, you have to factor in how long it will take to create the grant application. You can’t postpone your decision until the day before the application is due.

Interview Links & Other Resources

Make No Mistake: How to Make the Best Decision the First Time by Annette Dubrouillet

Grazie, Prego – Worrying About Past Decisions

Decision Making in a Bureaucracy – The Good, The Bad and The Paradox

Follow Annette Dubrouillet on Twitter

Connect with Annette Dubrouillet on LinkedIn

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